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Behind Barnes: Transport Manager

Keeping things running smoothly at Barnes Logistics is a challenging but a thoroughly rewarding task for our Midlands Transport Manager, Laurence Gray. We recently caught up with Laurence about his roles, career journey and his recommendations for others looking to join the industry…

       1.       What does your role as Midlands Transport Manager entail?

My main responsibility as Transport Manager is to keep the Midlands sites running efficiently and effectively.  This means keeping the fleet operational and legal whilst also making sure that we have the right number of professional drivers on the road to carry out the work required. Anticipating potential issues and creating solutions for them is also a vital responsibility. Finally, my role entails dealing with queries from customers and on behalf of our drivers too. 

2.       Can you tell us about your career journey, how did you get your job at Barnes?

Before I discovered my role in Logistics, I worked in a number of industries which included procurement and sales. Over time, I worked my way up in a different company which saw me moving from transport planner to shift manager. Whilst working there, the Midlands Transport Manager opportunity arose at Barnes and I thought this was the perfect career opportunity for me. After attending an interview with Barnes, it really opened my eyes to what I could achieve! It was fantastic that I got the green light for the job. 

3.       What does a typical day (or week!) look like for you?

At Barnes, my week varies depending on what is required from me. Ensuring that everything is running efficiently and to the best possible standards is really important and from here, I can look ahead at further improvements. At the beginning of the week, I work on financial reportings and oversee compliance tasks. Once this is done, I attend a site visit in Redditch to check that things are operating as they should. Typically, throughout the week I will be involved in the arranging and interviewing of candidates and conducting driver inductions. Monitoring the service schedule frequently to ensure targets are achieved on time and working on probations reviews are also essential tasks. My job role can extend away from the office as sometimes I will be required in the yard where I will usually find myself inspecting tyres which have low tread to see if they need replacing. As Midlands Transport Manager however, I would say that that the most important role is speaking to the drivers to check that things are going as they should and speaking with our customers to ensure that Barnes are providing a five-star service. 

4.       What would you recommend to others looking to join the industry?

I would say that within the Logistics sector, there are always opportunities available. It is a vast and dynamic industry offering plenty of varied jobs. Therefore, even if one role might not suit you, there are still plenty of different positions which could be more suitable for your skill set so I think it’s important that you don’t give up on the industry if things get tough. It is also worth considering that Logistics is an industry which is staying put and is ever-expanding as companies will always require items moving safely and securely from one location to another. There will always be the need to supply and deliver goods across the UK and the globe!

Rochdale Storage – The Ideal Solution

Rochdale: storage’s ideal solution. As experienced warehousing and logistics providers, we’ve put a huge amount of effort over the years as our business has grown into where our headquarters should be based.

What space offers value for money and return for our customers? Does the warehouse provide the very best in safety? Which location will allow us to offer convenience for drivers?

Following thorough research and pooling together our professional teams’ long-standing experience, we made the decision to base our headquarters in Rochdale.

The town lies just outside of Manchester – a city whose growth, wealth and business opportunities have soared exponentially over the past decade. Now standing as the UK’s second largest economy, Manchester is a hub for investment. With Rochdale lying less than 10 miles away from the city, our warehousing is the ideal partner to support business growth.

Not only is Rochdale storage advantageous for Manchester companies in terms of delivering goods to store, but our warehouses’ location also means that the transportation of stock to customers throughout the country is smooth and accessible. Sitting just off the M62, our Rochdale storage warehousing solutions offer easy access to Liverpool, through to Leeds and further out towards Yorkshire.

With the M6 only an hour away, Lancashire, Carlisle and Scotland can be accessed to the North, and easy travel down to Birmingham, Coventry and beyond to the South can be achieved.

Located in the North West of England, the Welsh border is a mere 50 miles away, providing connection to not only one country, but two – the Holyhead ferry route offers direct access to Dublin with up to six crossings a day.

No matter what sector your business deals in, there’s no better place to safely store your ambient temperature stock than Rochdale. As part of the Manchester’s rapidly growing enterprise scene within easy reach of motorway access to the North, South, Wales and Ireland for customer distribution – make your next storage move Rochdale.

Behind Barnes: Human Resources

As part of our Behind Barnes campaign, we recently caught up with Toni Gilmore, to find out all about her position as an HR Assistant at Barnes Logistics…

  1. What does your role as HR Assistant entail, Toni?

My main duties include making sure all legal documents (such as Drivers Licence etc.) and training is up to date. I also monitor probation reviews, recruitment and organising interviews with managers, as well as Inputting driver hours and reviewing wages reports.  Finally, I look after all holiday and employee allowances.

  1. Can you tell us about your career journey, how did you get your job at Barnes?

I went to Leeds Metropolitan University and studied Psychology.  When I finished my degree, I found an interest in HR and wanted to pursue a career in it.  My first job was in customer service and admin, and I then became a Shipping and Transport Coordinator within the same company. I saw a job posting advertised by Barnes Logistics and with my background in shipping, admin and my degree in Psychology, I was well experienced for the position.

  1. What does a typical day (or week!) look like for you?

The job can look very different from week to week as it depends on what is happening at different depots. Typically, the beginning of the week is focused on wages – collecting and filing all the information from the previous week from all the depots, for example, driver timesheets and tachograph information. This is logged in our system so we can create a wages report and send out purchase orders to agencies where we’ve used their drivers. In a typical week we would also arrange interviews, liaise with managers regarding any driver training which is due and arrange for that to be completed, enrol new starters onto the HR database and generally keep all the systems up to date.

  1. What would you recommend to others looking to join the industry?

I am a big believer in finding an entry level job in your desired career and working your way up. It also helps to research any professional qualifications specific to your desired role in order to stand out from other applicants.

If you think you have what it takes and are interested in a career in the transport and logistics profession, get in touch!

Best Storage in Manchester

When it comes to selecting the best storage warehouse for your businesses’ products, decision makers must take a number of factors into account.  Here at Barnes Logistics, we offer a secure warehouse, a range of flexible storage solutions and the implementation of JIT (Just In Time) Logistics strategies is there a better place to start when searching for the best storage in Manchester?

 

Our state of the art warehouse in Rochdale is an ideal choice for the best storage in the Manchester area, with convenient access off junction 20 on the M62 for distribution across the UK and even further afield to Europe. Offering 50,000 sq ft of secure storage space, we can accommodate a high volume of stock from our clients; and our fleets operate from more a than seven sites across the country to support a nationwide client base.  The key to our offering is flexibility: we offer flexible storage solutions including short, medium and long-term contracts to support our customers’ needs.

 

We also pride ourselves in using JIT logistics which, for one thing, allows us to play a vital part in reducing global waste, as well as offer the most efficient logistics services to our customers.  The demand-pull strategy of JIT logistics means that stock is only delivered when it is required, and our top of the range production scheduling software allows for the correct levels of stock to be ordered. Through the use of EDI (Electronic Data Interchange), suppliers and customers can communicate to ensure stock demand is up-to-date and is only obtained when a customer makes an order.

 

We recently had a visit from the Road Haulage Association – who rewarded us with an outstanding report which outlined how Barnes Logistics provides the best storage in Manchester with top safety measures implemented at all times and high quality software to contribute to the smooth-running of the warehouse.

 

Want to find out how we can assist you with the very best warehouse solutions?  Get in touch with our team today. 

Monitoring Stock Systems – Keeping It In-Warehouse

When looking to invest in warehousing for your business’ goods, the qualities one tends to think about looking for are security and financial value. But there are other aspects to consider – what about the simple quality of efficiency, and the advantages that it can bring?

 

When arranging for stock to be sent for storage, and when products must then be distributed to your customers, the last thing businesses need is to have each team member dealing with a shipment to have to track how many units are being ordered in or out in relation to the stored warehouse goods. This is where we come in, with our in-house Barnes stock systems.

 

We’ll take care of itemising your stock and ensuring all levels are monitored. Not only does this take the hassle out of this task for your own team, but also means that your business will be automatically notified when certain items’ stock levels are low.

 

For businesses looking to make external storage of their stock a valuable investment, choosing a company which promotes efficiency alongside safety and security is key. Which is why our Rochdale warehouse, recently acquired by Barnes Logistics in 2016, is the ideal choice. As well as our proven in-house stock system, our 50,000 sq ft of warehousing space offers the highest quality storage conveniently located for easy access to the UK’s major roads.

 

From electrical goods, to clothing, to ambient foods – we have the warehousing space to ensure your goods are housed securely, itemised methodically and delivered with our fleet of over 80 vehicles and 120 drivers. Furthermore, with Brexit negotiations hitting hurdle after hurdle, there has never been a more prudent time to stockpile goods ahead of potential future turbulence – a topic we have discussed at the end of last year.

 

Ready to make the most out of your warehousing investment? Get in touch with our team today.

The Year Ahead – What Can We Expect?

2018 is drawing to a close, and the year ahead is set to be an historic one for Britain as the country faces one of the biggest political shifts in decades. But what can the logistics and warehousing industry expect in the next year?

 

Whilst we, of course, cannot say for sure what will happen in the near future; there are certain events which we can predict will affect our industry significantly.

 

Of course, the main political event will come in March as we officially leave the European Union. The issue of the Irish border is one which is still not settled – so let us imagine both scenarios. The Irish backstop plan which, at this moment in time, seems the most likely, will see a ‘soft’ Brexit, but if an agreement cannot be reached we may head towards a hard Brexit which means that any trade with Europe will involve longer delivery times as drivers’ goods are stopped and checked at customs.

 

As we will not be bound by the same standards agreements, goods must be checked on borders to ensure that they are up to EU standards. Some have voiced concerns that the increased stop time as lorries wait to have their goods inspected will lead to an increase in illegal migrants boarding HGVs to enter the UK illegally, particularly as immigration laws will change as EU members will no longer be allowed to move freely to Britain as they once could.

 

Our final Brexit prediction is that of uncertainty. Such a huge political shift will lead to economic changes – and whilst few can say whether this will be for better or worse in both the short and long term, the value of the pound will be unpredictable. This means businesses will need to have invested in surplus stock before March – a subject we have spoken about previously with our safe and secure warehousing space available to store these excess goods as businesses ride out the turbulent times ahead.

 

The drivers’ shortage, a European-wide issue, may well be exacerbated in 2019. Workers may feel less inclined to move to the UK and fill vital positions; so, we can predict an industry-wide awareness and recruitment campaigns. Hopefully this will be backed and supported by the Government, with funding for training, education and apprenticeships.

 

Of course, it’s not all negativity in the future. Despite the changes that we’re going to face in 2019, the logistics and warehousing industry will remain a vital cog to UK industry and economics. Businesses must still trade, and we will be there to support them with first class Just In Time logistics services and secure storage – see you in 2019!

Storage Before Brexit: Secure The Future

It may be a topic, and indeed a word, which the majority of the country are sick to death of hearing; but this week Brexit has been grabbing more and more headlines as Theresa May tries hard to push her deal for leaving the European Union through Parliament. With the realities of our country’s future being brought into focus, we look at how businesses across the country can protect themselves against the uncertainty that 2019 will bring.

 

As the deal focuses on the divorce terms and the Northern Irish border – issues which, of course, affect businesses of all industries – but what all business owners and decision makers are lacking, is future trade agreements. Issues regarding who we will trade with, and at what tariff costs, is an issue which we will not see a resolution to in the near future.

 

Therefore, in the meantime, businesses can look to protect themselves by stockpiling goods. When the future of trading is so uncertain, having a surplus of stock is not the nightmare scenario it would usually be under normal circumstances. Making the investment in more goods now before the potential increase in importation charges after Brexit will ensure that businesses carry a known cost in this time of uncertainty.

 

In the past few years, we have invested in the latest warehousing technology, including our own in-house stock management system, in our secure 50,000 sq ft of storage space in Rochdale. Offering bespoke warehousing for all businesses, from technology to clothing to ambient food and beverage, we’re able to accommodate your warehousing needs no matter your stock size or length of storage needed. Less than 10 miles from Manchester, we’re located with easy access to the M62 for a quick connection to the UK’s roads and ports.

 

No matter the size of the business or the industry you trade in, it has never been more prudent to safeguard against the trading uncertainty looming in the near future of our country. If you’d like to learn more about how we can easily, safely and securely store your stock for Brexit, get in touch with our team of experts today.

The Death of the High Street – What does it mean for Logistics?

The high street has long been a staple of British culture; rows of shops from high-end department stores to family-run businesses have historically formed the hub of local communities and created bustling cities, but today, shops are closing down at an alarming rate as many consumers turn to online shopping. As a result, the high street aesthetic differs dramatically to how it used to, with square metres upon square metres of empty space occupying a shell that used to house popular retailers.

The disparity between today’s high street image and that of ten years ago is so extreme that many experts are predicting it will diminish entirely – the ‘Death of the High Street’, as they call it. Whilst the high street has brought significant business for the logistics industry for many years now, how will the closure of physical shops affect the sector? Some claim that logistics will be unaffected; whilst shops are closing, people are still shopping – just not in store – and therefore mass delivery of goods is still a necessity. Other experts however, fear that the extreme growth in the popularity of online shopping will bring with it an even greater pressure and demand than that already experienced by the logistics industry – whilst driver shortage is the current, prominent worry, warehousing space and turnaround efficiency could also become a concern. So, with this comes the topic of this post and the critical question; how can both traders and logistic companies continue to operate efficientlyand profitably during the death of the high street?

According to ParcelHero, by 2030, half of (approximately 100,000) physical stores will be obsolete. Whether such businesses will disappear completely is an entirely different matter – it is likely that some will exist in the online sphere only, whilst many others may struggle to recover from the financial hit. Experts claim that by 2030, e-commerce sales will account for 40% of all consumer to retailer transactions, although the figures are already high – TextLocal reports that almost 80% of people report having used their mobile phones for online shopping at some point, with over 20% doing so at least once a day.

Whilst this is excellent news as it signals the strength of our developing networks and technologies, for the logistics industry it brings a growing pressure, and not just in terms of delivery. Whilst the driver shortage and uncertain future of EU workers certainly raises concerns – as we have explored before – there is an additional, pressing problem: warehouse space. Researchers from the BBC claim that demands for warehouse space have risen due to the growing popularity of online shopping, with demand doubling over the past ten years. The total purchased/leased warehousing space across the UK now mirrors the dimensions of 3,000 Wembley Stadiums, with 60% being used by retailers. A decade ago, they accounted for just 1/3 of the space. In correlation with this has come rise in warehouse rental prices. So in addition to the sector’s aim to maximise and organise warehouse space to optimise deliveries and cater for the digital changes, for some, financial worries are present, particularly for smaller businesses.

At this point, the path to overcoming these issues is not black and white. Truthfully, it may take a number of years to calculate the perfect formula, and trial and error may become commonplace. Although digital shopping has been around for years now, its popularity has never been greater, and so it will take time to find the right balance that suits each individual logistics operator and their unique demand. In the meantime, there are a number of aspects that need to be prioritised to maximise smooth-running: cost, warehouse location, space, machinery needs, monitoring systems, staff and fleet size. Should all these be considered, it’s entirely possible that current warehousing concerns can be lessened, but as we say, we expect that a key factor amongst these priorities is time and simply exercising various methods until all boxes are ticked.

In many ways, the ‘Death of the High Street’ is a sad mark for British culture. Of course digitalisation has its strengths and its growth is certainly reflective of its usefulness to business; both national and global connectivity is readily available at the touch of a button, expanding potential demographics and offering wider profit opportunities, but as the industry has worked alongside retailers and their stores since shopping became such a prominent feature of our society, it is saddening to see many closing their doors permanently. Here at Barnes, we therefore think it’s important to adopt a positive perspective on this by seeing it as a new ‘era’. The online movement does not alter the necessity of the logistics industry for UK retailers, it just changes the dynamics somewhat, and in a time when the number of drivers is already worrying, it can be frustrating that the sector is faced with an additional concern. But, as with the driver shortage and Brexit, we’re confident that the industry will remain vigilant and resilient in the face of warehousing concerns and that the perfect formula will be found in no time.

If you’re a business in need of warehousing space, we are able to help as we have over 50,000sq feet of secure storage. To find out more about our facilities and to get in touch, click here.

Why is There No National Logistics Day?

August has long been known as ‘silly season’; this month alone we have seen National Afternoon Tea Week, National Left-Handed Day, National Prosecco Day and National Dog Day. Despite the seemingly arbitrary nature of such days, they have become a daily commonality, so much so that the media has now passed comment; Radio 1 recently took to doubting the necessity of having days dedicated to somewhat ridiculous causes – if they can be defined as a ‘cause’ that is. In reality, national days are little more than a marketing ploy. Admittedly, the marketing invention has proven undeniably successful, although perhaps most frustratingly it seems to be more successful for the bizarre national days rather than those that are truly in need of awareness, such as those that recognise illnesses or socio-economic issues. However, this got us thinking that there were perhaps issues and industries that are not allocated an awareness day, despite being arguably more important than the likes of ‘National Lazy Day’. There are various occupations and sectors that are vital to the UK economy and yet receive very little recognition, so here at Barnes we delve deeper into the question that, in our opinion, bares no rational answer – why is there is no National Logistics Day?

In recent months, we have expressed a belief that often, consumers are unaware of the process that brings the deliveries to their doorsteps and items to their local shops. Whilst a national day celebrating this process may help to bring about greater awareness, it also opens up an opportunity for what we would consider to be more significant still; it would allow for companies, industry bodies and the general public to celebrate the people behind logistics. It is vital to remember that although the supply chain process needs to be considered when making purchases, behind the packing, warehouse stocking and truck driving is a human being who is dedicated to providing a much-needed service. And with pressure mounting in the midst of a driver shortage crisis and the risk to businesses of losing employees due to Brexit, a National Day in which the nation and employers could come together may just be what is needed to remind logistics employees why their dedication matters, and could help towards boosting the industry’s image by promoting it as a brilliant career path that values their own.

The Road Haulage Association has made progress towards a day of this kind; for the past four years the industry body has hosted a ‘National Lorry Week’ in September. Whilst this is a step in the right direction, it places emphasis on the machinery as opposed to those who operate it. Additionally, it only promotes a narrow view of the logistics industry – whilst we appreciate that the RHA is a supporting body for road transport operators, the campaign leaves warehousing and storage specialists out of the celebration. A ‘National Logistics Day’ on the other hand would offer greater inclusivity of the entire supply chain.

Here at Barnes, we are always actively campaigning on behalf of logistic employees, from ensuring that all their rights are addressed to supporting workplace wellbeing. Under the umbrella term of wellbeing falls appreciation, as it truly does affect individual welfare. To address the concerns raised within this piece, we propose that National Lorry Week is combined with National Logistics Day, for even if these events go unrecognised to the general public, receiving acknowledgement from employers will boost morale, motivation and commitment. With persistence, this movement has the capability to achieve public attention which would subsequently aid the driver shortage and influence the consumer behaviour which has become so dependent on the supply chain. We argue that a day celebrating the supply chain has only positive outcomes.

With National Lorry Week just three weeks away, the opportunity to incorporate a wider element is there. Let us know how you plan on recognising your employers by dropping us a Tweet.

Shifting it up a Gear: Learner Drivers Take to the Motorway

Statistically, motorways are the safest of UK roads. One could not be judged however, for thinking otherwise – with their high speed, multiple lanes and various exits, they appear more complicated than standard A and B roads. Yet despite this, research has found motorway safety levels to be quite contrary to their aesthetic complexity – Aviva reported that accidents are actually seven times more likely to occur on rural roads than motorways – a figure that is somewhat surprising given the perceived dangers of the motorway.

 

The image of ‘danger’ that surrounds motorway driving could be seen to not only stem from repeated scare stories that have become a common place within our daily media consumption, but also from the demonization of such roads during our learning years. As a learner – the only driver exempt from using the motorway – the thought of using the motorway after qualifying without guidance can be intensely daunting, in fact, it is reported that one in twelve drivers will actively avoid using the motorway for at least six months after qualification. Given that it would do well for such roads to remain the safest to travel on, it seems absurd that until now, learners have been refused the opportunity to extend their experience portfolio to motorways. Until the beginning of June, it was legal for a driver to travel on the motorway having never done so before passing their test, and without guidance. It’s not hard to see how this could lead to dangerous road conditions with new drivers suddenly faced with a more complicated lane system on their own, further emphasised by the fact that these roads previously being ‘off limits’ can lead to nervous drivers behind the wheel – the thought process of ‘these roads must be difficult, because I was not previously allowed on them.’

 

Now however, the laws have been changed to address this. Since the 4th June 2018, learners have been permitted to use UK motorways under the guidance of an approved instructor and in a dual controlled car. Whilst these lessons are not compulsory, it is a significant step forward in bettering the experience of drivers prior to passing their test, and in our professional opinion, it can only help to make motorways safer still.

 

Whilst this is our opinion, it would seem that the general driving population is divided – with only 44% believing that learners should be allowed on the motorway without a full license. 42% supported the new laws, whilst the remaining 14% expressed a frustration in potentially being ‘stuck’ behind a learner who did not reach the speed limit. Although a total of 56% expressing the potential negative effects of the legislation, further research found that 70% wish the law had been changed sooner, as they would have benefited from lessons before they qualified.

 

Here at Barnes, we appreciate that there may be some safety concerns surrounding these new changes for those already qualified, however, as transport professionals in the midst of a skills shortage crisis, we welcome the new legislation and will be respectful of any learners that we may see on the motorway, as it is these drivers who may become the next generation of much-needed HGV operators. We strongly believe that if we can encourage young people to practice using the motorway whilst learning, the misconception that they must be too difficult to attempt will disappear, and improve safety levels on the UK’s roads will improve. And with this, it is entirely possible that such learners may come to enjoy motorway driving and pursue it as a career!

 

Let us know your thoughts on the new legislation by dropping us a tweet.