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Monitoring Stock Systems – Keeping It In-Warehouse

When looking to invest in warehousing for your business’ goods, the qualities one tends to think about looking for are security and financial value. But there are other aspects to consider – what about the simple quality of efficiency, and the advantages that it can bring?

 

When arranging for stock to be sent for storage, and when products must then be distributed to your customers, the last thing businesses need is to have each team member dealing with a shipment to have to track how many units are being ordered in or out in relation to the stored warehouse goods. This is where we come in, with our in-house Barnes stock systems.

 

We’ll take care of itemising your stock and ensuring all levels are monitored. Not only does this take the hassle out of this task for your own team, but also means that your business will be automatically notified when certain items’ stock levels are low.

 

For businesses looking to make external storage of their stock a valuable investment, choosing a company which promotes efficiency alongside safety and security is key. Which is why our Rochdale warehouse, recently acquired by Barnes Logistics in 2016, is the ideal choice. As well as our proven in-house stock system, our 50,000 sq ft of warehousing space offers the highest quality storage conveniently located for easy access to the UK’s major roads.

 

From electrical goods, to clothing, to ambient foods – we have the warehousing space to ensure your goods are housed securely, itemised methodically and delivered with our fleet of over 80 vehicles and 120 drivers. Furthermore, with Brexit negotiations hitting hurdle after hurdle, there has never been a more prudent time to stockpile goods ahead of potential future turbulence – a topic we have discussed at the end of last year.

 

Ready to make the most out of your warehousing investment? Get in touch with our team today.

The Year Ahead – What Can We Expect?

2018 is drawing to a close, and the year ahead is set to be an historic one for Britain as the country faces one of the biggest political shifts in decades. But what can the logistics and warehousing industry expect in the next year?

 

Whilst we, of course, cannot say for sure what will happen in the near future; there are certain events which we can predict will affect our industry significantly.

 

Of course, the main political event will come in March as we officially leave the European Union. The issue of the Irish border is one which is still not settled – so let us imagine both scenarios. The Irish backstop plan which, at this moment in time, seems the most likely, will see a ‘soft’ Brexit, but if an agreement cannot be reached we may head towards a hard Brexit which means that any trade with Europe will involve longer delivery times as drivers’ goods are stopped and checked at customs.

 

As we will not be bound by the same standards agreements, goods must be checked on borders to ensure that they are up to EU standards. Some have voiced concerns that the increased stop time as lorries wait to have their goods inspected will lead to an increase in illegal migrants boarding HGVs to enter the UK illegally, particularly as immigration laws will change as EU members will no longer be allowed to move freely to Britain as they once could.

 

Our final Brexit prediction is that of uncertainty. Such a huge political shift will lead to economic changes – and whilst few can say whether this will be for better or worse in both the short and long term, the value of the pound will be unpredictable. This means businesses will need to have invested in surplus stock before March – a subject we have spoken about previously with our safe and secure warehousing space available to store these excess goods as businesses ride out the turbulent times ahead.

 

The drivers’ shortage, a European-wide issue, may well be exacerbated in 2019. Workers may feel less inclined to move to the UK and fill vital positions; so, we can predict an industry-wide awareness and recruitment campaigns. Hopefully this will be backed and supported by the Government, with funding for training, education and apprenticeships.

 

Of course, it’s not all negativity in the future. Despite the changes that we’re going to face in 2019, the logistics and warehousing industry will remain a vital cog to UK industry and economics. Businesses must still trade, and we will be there to support them with first class Just In Time logistics services and secure storage – see you in 2019!

Storage Before Brexit: Secure The Future

It may be a topic, and indeed a word, which the majority of the country are sick to death of hearing; but this week Brexit has been grabbing more and more headlines as Theresa May tries hard to push her deal for leaving the European Union through Parliament. With the realities of our country’s future being brought into focus, we look at how businesses across the country can protect themselves against the uncertainty that 2019 will bring.

 

As the deal focuses on the divorce terms and the Northern Irish border – issues which, of course, affect businesses of all industries – but what all business owners and decision makers are lacking, is future trade agreements. Issues regarding who we will trade with, and at what tariff costs, is an issue which we will not see a resolution to in the near future.

 

Therefore, in the meantime, businesses can look to protect themselves by stockpiling goods. When the future of trading is so uncertain, having a surplus of stock is not the nightmare scenario it would usually be under normal circumstances. Making the investment in more goods now before the potential increase in importation charges after Brexit will ensure that businesses carry a known cost in this time of uncertainty.

 

In the past few years, we have invested in the latest warehousing technology, including our own in-house stock management system, in our secure 50,000 sq ft of storage space in Rochdale. Offering bespoke warehousing for all businesses, from technology to clothing to ambient food and beverage, we’re able to accommodate your warehousing needs no matter your stock size or length of storage needed. Less than 10 miles from Manchester, we’re located with easy access to the M62 for a quick connection to the UK’s roads and ports.

 

No matter the size of the business or the industry you trade in, it has never been more prudent to safeguard against the trading uncertainty looming in the near future of our country. If you’d like to learn more about how we can easily, safely and securely store your stock for Brexit, get in touch with our team of experts today.

The Death of the High Street – What does it mean for Logistics?

The high street has long been a staple of British culture; rows of shops from high-end department stores to family-run businesses have historically formed the hub of local communities and created bustling cities, but today, shops are closing down at an alarming rate as many consumers turn to online shopping. As a result, the high street aesthetic differs dramatically to how it used to, with square metres upon square metres of empty space occupying a shell that used to house popular retailers.

The disparity between today’s high street image and that of ten years ago is so extreme that many experts are predicting it will diminish entirely – the ‘Death of the High Street’, as they call it. Whilst the high street has brought significant business for the logistics industry for many years now, how will the closure of physical shops affect the sector? Some claim that logistics will be unaffected; whilst shops are closing, people are still shopping – just not in store – and therefore mass delivery of goods is still a necessity. Other experts however, fear that the extreme growth in the popularity of online shopping will bring with it an even greater pressure and demand than that already experienced by the logistics industry – whilst driver shortage is the current, prominent worry, warehousing space and turnaround efficiency could also become a concern. So, with this comes the topic of this post and the critical question; how can both traders and logistic companies continue to operate efficientlyand profitably during the death of the high street?

According to ParcelHero, by 2030, half of (approximately 100,000) physical stores will be obsolete. Whether such businesses will disappear completely is an entirely different matter – it is likely that some will exist in the online sphere only, whilst many others may struggle to recover from the financial hit. Experts claim that by 2030, e-commerce sales will account for 40% of all consumer to retailer transactions, although the figures are already high – TextLocal reports that almost 80% of people report having used their mobile phones for online shopping at some point, with over 20% doing so at least once a day.

Whilst this is excellent news as it signals the strength of our developing networks and technologies, for the logistics industry it brings a growing pressure, and not just in terms of delivery. Whilst the driver shortage and uncertain future of EU workers certainly raises concerns – as we have explored before – there is an additional, pressing problem: warehouse space. Researchers from the BBC claim that demands for warehouse space have risen due to the growing popularity of online shopping, with demand doubling over the past ten years. The total purchased/leased warehousing space across the UK now mirrors the dimensions of 3,000 Wembley Stadiums, with 60% being used by retailers. A decade ago, they accounted for just 1/3 of the space. In correlation with this has come rise in warehouse rental prices. So in addition to the sector’s aim to maximise and organise warehouse space to optimise deliveries and cater for the digital changes, for some, financial worries are present, particularly for smaller businesses.

At this point, the path to overcoming these issues is not black and white. Truthfully, it may take a number of years to calculate the perfect formula, and trial and error may become commonplace. Although digital shopping has been around for years now, its popularity has never been greater, and so it will take time to find the right balance that suits each individual logistics operator and their unique demand. In the meantime, there are a number of aspects that need to be prioritised to maximise smooth-running: cost, warehouse location, space, machinery needs, monitoring systems, staff and fleet size. Should all these be considered, it’s entirely possible that current warehousing concerns can be lessened, but as we say, we expect that a key factor amongst these priorities is time and simply exercising various methods until all boxes are ticked.

In many ways, the ‘Death of the High Street’ is a sad mark for British culture. Of course digitalisation has its strengths and its growth is certainly reflective of its usefulness to business; both national and global connectivity is readily available at the touch of a button, expanding potential demographics and offering wider profit opportunities, but as the industry has worked alongside retailers and their stores since shopping became such a prominent feature of our society, it is saddening to see many closing their doors permanently. Here at Barnes, we therefore think it’s important to adopt a positive perspective on this by seeing it as a new ‘era’. The online movement does not alter the necessity of the logistics industry for UK retailers, it just changes the dynamics somewhat, and in a time when the number of drivers is already worrying, it can be frustrating that the sector is faced with an additional concern. But, as with the driver shortage and Brexit, we’re confident that the industry will remain vigilant and resilient in the face of warehousing concerns and that the perfect formula will be found in no time.

If you’re a business in need of warehousing space, we are able to help as we have over 50,000sq feet of secure storage. To find out more about our facilities and to get in touch, click here.

LEVERAGING YOUR LOGISTICS

Business is by its very nature competitive as rivals attempt to beat their competitors on a range of measures from value, cost and quality right through to service, speed of delivery or availability of key products.

Decisions on who to use are taken every day, balancing the demand for the product with a suitable price or how quickly will it be delivered.  For example, is it worth waiting a month for a cheaper part from China when I could get a more expensive version made in the UK and delivered tomorrow?  There are rarely right or wrong answers but ones that best suit the business at that time or for that purpose.

One area that is however getting increasingly important is the world of logistics as companies make promises to beat their competitors in getting products to their customers quicker or at a designated time to meet the demand or onward chain.

The world of logistics continues to grow and evolve to meet on-line demand and the desire for next day deliveries.  In its simplest form, logistics is the planning process as well as the implementation of efficient and effective storage of raw materials, inventory, finished goods and services. It also refers to the flow and transportation of product from the warehouse to the consumer.

A successful delivery of the service can offer customers a competitive edge against other business, but to do so it is essential to provide a system or process by which customer needs can be fulfilled in the most efficient manner.

At Barnes Logistics we strive to provide shipments of materials in the most accurate and efficient manner possible and have been successful enough to achieve ‘Just in Time’ accreditation – an award that’s critical for the highly automated and efficient car manufacturing sector.

Logistics however are more than just moving and storing products.  They are also about delivering on your promises and building good consumer relations. With an effective and efficient logistics partner or process these efficiencies and good relations can be levered to offer your business a competitive advantage.

Logistics is involved throughout the whole business chain from transporting raw materials through to manufacture, storage and onward sale of a finished product.  Good logistics is the link that hold businesses together and when levered effectively can bring a competitive advantage at each stage in the process whether through cost, accuracy on deliveries or exceptional customer service.

Having the right logistics partner is essential for the success of any business, providing trusted and timely support.  With more than 100 drivers on the road each day, backed up by the latest transport and logistics technologies and vehicles, the Barnes Logistics team of professionals ensures that not only do our customers receive a tailored logistical solution, but an opportunity to leverage it to create a more competitive business.