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The Value of Fleet Investment

Logistics businesses depend on their fleet – it’s at the very heart of their success. But unlike non-commercial vehicles, business fleets go through more wear and tear in a shorter amount of time. As a company’s fleet brings in vital revenue, it is imperative that capital is re-invested back into these vehicles.

Why? Our commercial vehicles must constantly be upgraded; but this investment needn’t be viewed as a necessary but tiresome expense – it also results in improved efficiency and greater reliability.

With drivers undertaking frequent shifts, investing in quality vehicles is imperative. Up-to-date vehicles have the latest technology, which increases the safety of the drivers and other road-users as well as the efficiency of the fleet, ultimately escalating profits. Upgrading means investing in the latest safety equipment like rear view cameras, hands-free smartphone connections, and up-to-date tachographs. Modern satellite navigation systems also drastically decrease delivery time by helping drivers navigate road closures and traffic build-ups, among other things. Furthermore, these new fleet improvemennts boost employee satisfaction and serve as a great promotion for a company’s products or services.

Reductions in maintenance costs are another benefit of the investment in fleet vehicles; as they are used every day they require regular maintenance. Fleet upgrades reduce a company’s maintenance costs and extend the vehicles life span as well as make sure the vehicle is safe to drive. Costly maintenance repairs can also negatively affect the delivery time of a load, negatively reflecting on the company’s overall reputation.

Another means to improving the value of a fleet is investment into good quality, professional drivers. Ensuring the hiring of properly trained, qualified drivers with experience is an absolute must. Laws and legislations regularly change with driving laws, and so ensuring one has competent drivers means that businesses are always above board and in accordance with the law.

Investment into the sustainability of HGVs is a big topic at the moment, with the current climate situation and the newly imposed government targets for the reduction of emissions, the eradication of fossil fuelled vehicles doesn’t seem too farfetched. Additionally, the rising number of natural gas fuelling stations in the UK is an indication that business owners are looking to invest in environmentally friendly transport vehicles. Although the technology is still in its developing stages, it’s always worth keeping an eye on and investing in the future before laws change and businesses are penalised heavily for burying their heads in the sand and continuing to run fossil fuelled HGVs.

As stated, business owners can only invest when these new eco-technologies are advanced enough to be commercially viable, and many vehicles are still reliant on fossil fuels. However, companies can still choose to improve their fleet’s fuel efficiency. Commercial fleets can create huge fuel costs and, for some companies, these costs are as big as their payroll. The automotive industry is investing their efforts into decreasing the overall consumption of fuel across the board and improving fuel efficiency in the logistics sector would be a huge step in the right direction.

Overall, the value of fleet investment is of vital importance to safeguard a business for the furture, and it’s a process we consisitently undertake at Barnes to ensure we provide the safest, most reliable logistics services for our customers. Explore how we can help you with our logistics services.

The Immigrant Lorry Crisis

When it comes to news reports involving the professional driving industry, there is a scarcity in themes. Largely, reports fall into three categories; road accidents involving HGVs, the implications that Brexit may have and the ‘illegal immigrant lorry crisis’. The immigrant crisis, as it’s labelled, is a topic which we at Barnes are yet to speak on, and it is a topic that can be difficult to discuss as there are various elements to it – but as an issue which can compromise the safety of hardworking professional drivers, it is one we feel compelled to explore.

A story of ‘illegal immigrants’ recently circulated the British tabloids; eleven people, including three children and a baby, entered the UK by lorry, only surviving their journey by eating the chocolate that the haulier was carrying. The circumstances surrounding this particular story are not uncommon; the group had boarded the lorry as it travelled from mainland Europe and then secured the vehicle in such a way that it could not be easily opened again, reducing the likelihood of them being found before reaching their desired destination. Although this narrative is a commonality, it is important to consider that not all who secretly stow themselves away are criminals, in many cases, the very act of illegal hitch-hiking appears desperate and involves a significant level of risk to it, suggesting that it is entirely possible that the people found on board were refugees or asylum seekers who simply hoped for a safer life based in the UK.

 

In such situations, regardless of the circumstances of the stowaway, it is also important for us to address how drivers can deal with such situations, as ensuring their safety is paramount. Unfortunately, many professional drivers feel let down by the existingHYPERLINK “https://www.gov.uk/guidance/secure-your-vehicle-to-help-stop-illegal-immigration” legalities; as it currently stands, legislation states that drivers must secure their lorry in a way that would prevent anyone from entering the trailer. In the event of a ‘clandestine entrant’ being found on board, drivers can face a fine of £2000 per person found on board. Even if the driver did not willingly or knowingly transport them, they face the fine as it demonstrates that their vehicle security measures have failed, and were therefore insufficient. These penalties are severe, particularly when the majority of drivers are not intentionally smuggling people across borders; in many cases, the desperation of stowaways can overcome the efforts of the driver, and there have been multiple cases reported where the driver has checked, rechecked, and even passed through specialised scanning equipment, but all have failed to detect any bodies on board. In such instances, the driver truly cannot be held accountable; if advanced technology fails to find stowaways, how could the driver be expected to? And yet many miles later, when eventually discovered, both the driver and stowaways face being detained.

 

It seems that the system of fining and detaining has fuelled anger towards immigrants who cross borders on lorries. Make no mistake, we are certainly not encouraging, agreeing with or promoting illegal immigration, but, we urge both the government and public to consider the safety of both the driver and immigrants. Our hardworking drivers should not be penalised or faced with potential penalties in these events, nor should they be locked away in a cell whilst investigations are begun.

 

As a business that operates within the logistics industry, we know that drivers are experiencing this far too commonly, and as a result, better systems are needed immediately, as they cannot continue to be subjected to the physical, emotional and financial stress that comes with the discovery of unknown passengers in their vehicle and the legalities that follow. If the circumstances are not addressed, we fear that drivers will continue down this same road for the foreseeable future, but we are hopeful that if we, and others alike, continue to raise awareness of this issue, policy makers will be encouraged to take necessary action.

 

Please share with us how you think our country can better protect our professional drivers by dropping us a tweet.

Why is There No National Logistics Day?

August has long been known as ‘silly season’; this month alone we have seen National Afternoon Tea Week, National Left-Handed Day, National Prosecco Day and National Dog Day. Despite the seemingly arbitrary nature of such days, they have become a daily commonality, so much so that the media has now passed comment; Radio 1 recently took to doubting the necessity of having days dedicated to somewhat ridiculous causes – if they can be defined as a ‘cause’ that is. In reality, national days are little more than a marketing ploy. Admittedly, the marketing invention has proven undeniably successful, although perhaps most frustratingly it seems to be more successful for the bizarre national days rather than those that are truly in need of awareness, such as those that recognise illnesses or socio-economic issues. However, this got us thinking that there were perhaps issues and industries that are not allocated an awareness day, despite being arguably more important than the likes of ‘National Lazy Day’. There are various occupations and sectors that are vital to the UK economy and yet receive very little recognition, so here at Barnes we delve deeper into the question that, in our opinion, bares no rational answer – why is there is no National Logistics Day?

In recent months, we have expressed a belief that often, consumers are unaware of the process that brings the deliveries to their doorsteps and items to their local shops. Whilst a national day celebrating this process may help to bring about greater awareness, it also opens up an opportunity for what we would consider to be more significant still; it would allow for companies, industry bodies and the general public to celebrate the people behind logistics. It is vital to remember that although the supply chain process needs to be considered when making purchases, behind the packing, warehouse stocking and truck driving is a human being who is dedicated to providing a much-needed service. And with pressure mounting in the midst of a driver shortage crisis and the risk to businesses of losing employees due to Brexit, a National Day in which the nation and employers could come together may just be what is needed to remind logistics employees why their dedication matters, and could help towards boosting the industry’s image by promoting it as a brilliant career path that values their own.

The Road Haulage Association has made progress towards a day of this kind; for the past four years the industry body has hosted a ‘National Lorry Week’ in September. Whilst this is a step in the right direction, it places emphasis on the machinery as opposed to those who operate it. Additionally, it only promotes a narrow view of the logistics industry – whilst we appreciate that the RHA is a supporting body for road transport operators, the campaign leaves warehousing and storage specialists out of the celebration. A ‘National Logistics Day’ on the other hand would offer greater inclusivity of the entire supply chain.

Here at Barnes, we are always actively campaigning on behalf of logistic employees, from ensuring that all their rights are addressed to supporting workplace wellbeing. Under the umbrella term of wellbeing falls appreciation, as it truly does affect individual welfare. To address the concerns raised within this piece, we propose that National Lorry Week is combined with National Logistics Day, for even if these events go unrecognised to the general public, receiving acknowledgement from employers will boost morale, motivation and commitment. With persistence, this movement has the capability to achieve public attention which would subsequently aid the driver shortage and influence the consumer behaviour which has become so dependent on the supply chain. We argue that a day celebrating the supply chain has only positive outcomes.

With National Lorry Week just three weeks away, the opportunity to incorporate a wider element is there. Let us know how you plan on recognising your employers by dropping us a Tweet.